I have always been fascinated by the ships and vehicles of the Star Wars universe, and the Millennium Falcon is no different. I have owned three different versions of it, including the original toy by Kenner, the Legacy Collection Falcon from 2008, and the Original Trilogy ship from 2004. Each of these variations have features that make each one both similar, and unique amongst Star Wars toys.

Over the years we have seen better features and greater detail added to most of the ships and vehicles in the Star Wars toy lines by Kenner, and their successor, Hasbro. This year we have a new iteration of the iconic ship as seen in Solo: A Star Wars Story. The Kessel Run Millennium Falcon made its debut at the New York Toy Fair 2018, and just from the initial images and videos, I was not impressed. I could already see that it was small. Just how small would not become apparent until last Wednesday.

The Packaging

Target shipped the product as if real coaxium were being smuggled inside, and underneath all of the miniature air bags was nestled a box nineteen and a half inches long, and fifteen inches wide. I thought to myself, “you’re kidding right? It’s in a dozen pieces?” No, it’s not.

It is small, but in true fashion, Hasbro never fails to deliver awesome artwork on their packaging. The front of the box is divided between art on the right, and a window panel on the left. The figure does not have a window panel in this box, but rather an image printed in the lower right hand corner. The top of the box features a cut out where a Try Me! feature is available, allowing you to press a button, which will activate lights on the mandibles, as well as brief sound effects.

What’s Inside The Box

Opening the box, you find a single slide out tray, with the ship secured in the center, the instruction sheet, decal sheet, and three separate plastic bags stuffed in the corners. Each of these bags contains the panels in one, the escape pod, and the action figure, cannon, and radar dish in the other. Assembly is straightforward with two panel sections fitting in the mandibles, and four fitting on the aft part of the ship. The escape pod simply snaps into place, as does the dorsal cannon and radar dish. The ventral cannon is molded into the bottom half of the ship, which looks horrible, and has no real use at all.

The Han Solo action figure is 3.75″ with seven points of articulation, to include wrist swivel. I found the figure to have very loose joints, and difficult to pose, along with a DL-44 blaster that will not stay secured in the holster. The head sculpt is decent, and the figure is presented with a black tunic, blue trousers, and gun belt. No jacket is included. Like all of the Solo 3.75″ basic figures, Han features Force Link 2.0, and speaks several phrases, with sound effects.

The Falcon is eighteen and a half inches in length, fourteen inches wide, and roughly four inches tall. It has molded landing gear on the bottom, which do not retract. The front landing gear serves as a pressure activation switch for the motion activated lights and sounds. The overall design of the ship is nice, with very clean solid white panels, however the plastic is extremely thin, and of the same design as the much smaller Force Link 2.0 Millennium Falcon toy.

The cockpit is extremely small, only able to accommodate one figure, even though it has controls for two. I suppose Qi’ra might fit in their with Han, and I do like the way that the control console flips up out of the way to allow the figure to fit inside. On a side note I think that this is a missed opportunity for Hasbro to include this feature on such vehicles as the new X-Wing and A-Wing fighters.

Hasbro's Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro’s Kessel Run Millennium Falcon

The rear of the ship features two compartments where a figure can lay down inside of them, as that is the only room available. One of them is for smuggling, and the coaxium container can fits inside it as well. The dorsal cannon and radar dish are both stationary features on the ship. The escape pod has some nice detailing on the rear where the thrusters are molded, and there are two, twin blaster cannons that fold or on the front. In addition the coaxium container can fit inside the escape pod. The pod snaps into place between the mandibles, and it also includes a Force Link NFC, which activate blaster and flying sounds.

The selling points of this toy are obviously the motion activated light and sound effects, which do not disappoint. Three double “A” batteries are used to power the electronic features. On the bottom of the left mandible is a power switch, which must be moved from the center (Try Me!) mode to the front. Once done, you can lift the ship up off of the table, and immediately you hear the engines whine and kick in. Pushing the ship forward and then side to side will activate banking and swooshing sounds. On the left side is a button, which when pressed will activate the cannon firing sounds, and then holding it down will activate the sound of a concussion missile firing.

On the right side is another button which will activate the blue lights on the mandible. There are three sets of lights on each one: on the top, the sides, and the front. These lights get faster each time you press the button, and on the third time you hear the alarm sounding, and the ship will rumble while the lights turn red and the panels pop off. The engine will go through the shut down procedure after this, and it is a really cool feature.

My Overall Impression

All personal bias aside, I have to give Hasbro credit for the level of creativity and features that were included in the Kessel Run Millennium Falcon. I really like the clean, white appearance of the toy, as well as the motion activated lights and sounds. I did not like the figure, particularly since the weapon would not remain holstered. If I could only change one thing about this toy, it would be to include a light up engine back synched with the other effects. That would have made the $80 dollar price tag more bearable.

In closing, the only thing that really detracts from this toy is it’s scale. I would pay three times the cost to see this ship in an Original Trilogy or Legacy size, with the same features. It’s a great product, and a great Star Wars toy for kids, but if you’re a serious collector, then this ship’s price tag may just be too much of a gamble for you to take.

Hasbro's Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro’s Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro's Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro’s Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro's Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro’s Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro's Kessel Run Millennium Falcon
Hasbro’s Kessel Run Millennium Falcon

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